What GPU to buy?

Questions and Answers : Unix/Linux : What GPU to buy?
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Message 1988192 - Posted: 31 Mar 2019, 19:53:58 UTC
Last modified: 31 Mar 2019, 19:54:32 UTC

I am new to building a PC, coming from Apple. I put a system together, but returned the RX580 GPU, drive crashing out the x windows system.

I have a AMD Ryzen 5 2600 running on an MSI B450 motherboard with a 650W power supply.

I need the GPU to be supported with ubuntu 18.04 LTS

What would be a decent,but not too expensive GPU with good performance?
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Message 1988199 - Posted: 31 Mar 2019, 20:34:05 UTC

It might mean changing from AMD to nVidia families....
But just now the nVidia GTX1660 & GTX1660 look to be giving good bang for the bucks - in the UK they more or less straddle the RX580 price, and, if they are like other members of the GTX series are quite easy to get going and really do deliver the performance.
Similar in price, and a bit further down the performance scale comes the GTX1060, and maybe the GTX1070 - these are slightly older technology units, but still well up there in therms of performance.

(If you want to blow the bank jump to the RTX2080ti.....)
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Message 1988663 - Posted: 4 Apr 2019, 2:45:49 UTC - in response to Message 1988199.  

I have been pondering which one to buy eventually, and right now I am debating between the RTX 2060 and the GTX 1660 (Ti or non-Ti). However, AMD is supposed to be releasing Navi later this year, so I am going to be patient and at least see what will be available there before making a decision.
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Message 1988755 - Posted: 4 Apr 2019, 17:26:20 UTC - in response to Message 1988663.  

I doubt the Navi gpus supposedly appearing later this year will be in the same price category as the GTX 1660 or 1660 TI. Probably closer to the RTX 2060. Still a guess at this time. You obviously are in no hurry to build the computer if willing to wait for Navi.
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Message 1988758 - Posted: 4 Apr 2019, 17:45:31 UTC - in response to Message 1988755.  

I doubt the Navi gpus supposedly appearing later this year will be in the same price category as the GTX 1660 or 1660 TI. Probably closer to the RTX 2060. Still a guess at this time. You obviously are in no hurry to build the computer if willing to wait for Navi.
Correct, I am in no rush at all. My PCIe slots are vacant and I was waiting on buying a GPU until I got a better feel for what to get. I also have not been reading too much about Navi. Is it your gut that it isn't going to be ready this year or are there other signs?

I guess what I was trying to say is I was going to hang tight with buying something until I saw what Navi had to offer, both in price and performance.
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Message 1998891 - Posted: 20 Jun 2019, 6:21:02 UTC

First time posting here . . .

I'm interested in this question too. I am putting into service two older Dell machines that I got hold of, and would like to add a GPU to them. Currently I have 10 machines running BOINC, but none of them have a GPU for processing (just onboard graphics, which don't seem to get used much under Ubuntu).

The question I have is: if the same chipset (GTX1060, for example) is used in multiple different video cards from multiple different manufacturers, how would I decide what card to buy? I cna work through differences such as power requirements and physical size, but what I'm wondering about is compatibility with the BOINC software under Unubtu.

How would I know that a given card will work, even though it has a recommended chipset?
Many thanks,
Brandon Clark
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Message 1998892 - Posted: 20 Jun 2019, 7:00:53 UTC - in response to Message 1998891.  
Last modified: 20 Jun 2019, 7:01:57 UTC

Well as far as I am aware most modern GPU's run perfectly OK under Ubuntu. I currently have 3 machines, on Ubuntu 18.04, 2 running pairs of Nvidia GTX 750ti's and one running a pair of GTX 1060's

As to which manufacturer, that really is a matter of choice, if you have a favourite one then go with them. For SETI@home all the well known brands will work fine.
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Message 1998980 - Posted: 21 Jun 2019, 2:03:54 UTC - in response to Message 1998892.  

That's good to hear. I just don't have any experience doing GPU computing with BOINC yet, so it's new to me. Never been a heavy gamer either, so graphics cards are not my strong point.

It was a surprise to me to find that the same chipset gets used across many different video cards. I always figured that whomever made a video card made all the critical components. Thinking about it now though it isn't so surprising. The same thing happens with motherboards: an Asus motherboard might have Sandisk memory and an Intel processor.
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Message 1998996 - Posted: 21 Jun 2019, 5:55:47 UTC

Well for Nvidia the current "big hitters" are the "20" series with prices to match, with the GTX 2080ti basically being the top card (the higher the number the better the card) also the "Ti" at the end stands for Titanium and just means it is a more powerful version.

However the older "10" series is possibly the best value for money. You mentioned the GTX 1060, which is a good card in performance and has a good "power to work" ratio.

There is of course the "budget" card the GTX 1660ti offering performance in the "20" series range but cheaper. I have one on my Windows gaming box and it is without doubt the most powerful card I have ever owned.

Unfortunately I know very little about AMD gpu's and would not offer advice.
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Message 1999031 - Posted: 21 Jun 2019, 12:07:06 UTC - in response to Message 1998891.  


The question I have is: if the same chipset (GTX1060, for example) is used in multiple different video cards from multiple different manufacturers, how would I decide what card to buy? I cna work through differences such as power requirements and physical size, but what I'm wondering about is compatibility with the BOINC software under Unubtu.

How would I know that a given card will work, even though it has a recommended chipset?
Many thanks,
Brandon Clark


I am running 3-4 different brands of gtx 1060 3GB's under Linux/Special Sauce/Tbar's all-in-one. I have had zero trouble with any of them. They all perform within yelling distance of each other.
I have had a couple used crap out on me as soon as I started using them but the seller refunded so it was apparently the luck of the draw.

I would select a 6 pin power supply and get the cheapest, used gtx 1060 3GB you can find avoiding the PNY brand.

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Message 1999056 - Posted: 21 Jun 2019, 16:36:58 UTC

If you are only going to run Seti project, then I would recommend switching to Nvidia brand because of Linux and the "special sauce" application. If you are going to run other projects like MilkyWay or Einstein, ATI/AMD is the preferred brand.
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Message 1999530 - Posted: 25 Jun 2019, 5:46:48 UTC - in response to Message 1999056.  

Special Sauce application? I'm not familiar with that.
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Message 1999531 - Posted: 25 Jun 2019, 6:44:31 UTC

"Special Sauce" is an extremely highly optimised application that only newer nVidia GPUs under Linux - and is very much faster than anything else
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Message 2010607 - Posted: 4 Sep 2019, 4:02:18 UTC

Just to update, I put dual Gtx 1070 ti in 1 system, a Gtx 1070 ti in another. Also a Gtx 1660 ti in another. All seem to perform very well.
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Message 2011366 - Posted: 9 Sep 2019, 13:38:03 UTC

I've researched GPU selection quite a bit recently, and the GTX 1060s are at the top of my list. Purchase price for the used cards is great at $90-100 when considering the credit/time/$/power ratios. They also have quite a bit of installation flexibility if you get the "mini" models which basically match the performance of the full-size models, and the single 6-pin power connectors also provide a lot of flexibility since you only need one, and the power draw for the card is low enough that you can easily adapt molex and sata connectors to provide more power to additional cards if needed. I avoid using the molex and sata power connectors when possible, but the option is there if needed, and plan to use two or more in parallel if you convert (mind your power ratings, and do the math). The 1060s also seem to run quite cool, which is nice, especially if you plan to run multiple cards inside a typical PC case.
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Message 2013678 - Posted: 29 Sep 2019, 5:29:49 UTC - in response to Message 1988663.  

I am interested to know how your comparison research went in deciding 'between the RTX 2060 and the GTX 1660 (Ti or non-Ti)'- did you come to a decision and actually purchase - and if so which one and how is it performing?
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Questions and Answers : Unix/Linux : What GPU to buy?


 
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